INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDORSING HEALTH SCIENCE RESEARCH

Volume 3            Issue 4            December 2015

The Understanding of Bioethics: Truth-Telling to Patients of Cancer in Pakistani Perspective

Amir Abdullah

Northwest Institute of Health Sciences, Peshawar, KPK, Pakistan

Corresponding author email: amir.abdullah@nwihs.edu.pk

Abstract

Regardless of advancement in the health care profession, cancer is the leading cause of death. After diagnosing the cancer patient, it is difficult for health care professionals to tell the truth or not. A successful relationship between patients and health care providers depends on the establishment of trust, which is strongly connected with communication based on truth. According to utilitarian argument, it is claimed that health professionals must do something which will produce more relief than anything else that it would render. In utilitarianism moral theory, health professionals will hold morally some right actions which will maximize utility, happiness, welfare and well-being. According to Kant, the consequences are not sufficient for making judgment, and informed consent of disease and treatment must be shared with the patient or family members to maintain the dignity. The doctor needs to minimize his/her personal assumptions in treatment and prognosis.

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Fitness consequences of dietary patterns and consumption in young girls

Sadaf Ahmed, Shamoon Noushad & Mahnoor Nadeem

Advance Educational Institute & Research Centre, Pakistan

Corresponding author email: Sadaf@aeirc-edu.com

Abstract

The  investigation  of usual dietary patterns are of physiological significance  including carbohydrate rich diet, caffeine consumption, protein intake specifically red and white meat along with intake of dietary supplements, milk and juices utilization as they have known to effect BMI and  body fat distribution of those with increasing body weight, underweight and normal weight. The study was carried out on 435 university girls aged between 18 to 25 Years, we used the multiple logistic to investigate the relationship of dietary habits, family history, BMI, waist-hip ratio and body fat distribution.  The result showed that there is no direct relation of body mass with dietary habits as the Girls with BMI <18 found to take the diet characterized by decrease consumption of good diet (milk, juices, egg, mineral supplements) and increase consumption of bad diet (junk food, fried and oil rich food), while girls with > 23 considered as overweight found diet conscious and were taking healthy diet. The association of these dietary patterns with raised body fat distribution, BMI and hip to waist ratio may specify the risk of developing health maladies but we conclude that in our population the lean girls are taking more junk food and are prone to various diseases more than the obese. We recommend that these unhealthy dietary patterns should be avoided as they may be a silent cause of many health issues.

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Private and Public Nursing Schools in Karachi, Pakistan

Amber Hussain Sayani & Dilshad Begum Maqsad Jan

The Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Karachi Pakistan

Corresponding Author Email: amber.hussain.mn14@student.aku.edu & dilshad.begum@student.aku.edu

Abstract

Nursing is a field which is directly affecting patients’ quality of life. For this, there is a dire need to bring competent and professional nurses who pass on the dignity of their nursing profession. This heavy responsibility to produce such competent and professional nurses lies on educational institutions and nursing schools. Educational institutions play a vital role in offering a standard of education for future nurses. Hence, it is essential or educational institutions of nursing to undergo a quality assurance process in order to monitor their efficiency and standards of nursing education. While comparing two nursing institutions, we found some issues and challenges in both private and public institutions. Public institution has the resources, but poor strategic planning for initiating the new programs; while private institute cannot expand their programs due to lack of resources. Private institute has a better education system as compared to the public institute despite of limited possessions.

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Medical education as a necessitate for field force.

Shamoon Noushad1, Sadaf Ahmed1&2 & Faiza Ahmed1

Advance Educational Institute & Research Centre (AEIRC)

University Of Karachi

Corresponding author email: Shamoon@aeirc-edu.com

Abstract

Caregivers are important escort in the healing journey of any patient. Our country in last decades excel so much in terms of offering training programes for nurses and midwives to bridge the gap between the therapeutic interventions and knowledge of these working individuals. We have done a survey on 182 nurses both male and female working in specifically small towns and trust hospitals. They were interviewed about their skills and the duties allocated to them. With reference to the patient care and conditions they were inquired about the medical background and awareness of the sufferer’s ailment. We have found nearly disappointing results as almost 71% of these workers were ignorant of the fact that they lack basic knowledge of related medical conditions of concerned patients. Rest of the data also gave the evidence for a huge breach among the awareness, education and realistic approach in this selected workforce. We suggest that caregivers must be aware of indications and have strong medical foundation of the concerned departments where they are serving. We propose the medical education and clinical workshops for this set of serving individuals at ground levels along with the technical fine tuning with the help of case studies and practice. We recommend to improve this field force especially who are serving the majorities and in rural areas.

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Overcoming Personal Biases: A key for Effective Performance Appraisal

Nawroz Bibi Zeenat Shah1, Sobia Idrees2 & Misbah Zafar3

1.Aga Khan Health Services Program (AKHSP) center, Gilgit Baltistan,

2.College of Nursing, Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto Medical University (PIMS), Islamabad.

3.SaidaWaheed FMH College of Nursing, Lahore

Corresponding Author Email: sobia_idrees@ymail.com

Abstract

Performance appraisal is a very challenging task for a manger that needs expertise along with commitment to fulfill the process in a fair and transparent manner. There are some standards, which are very essential for motivation of the staff and organizational growth. Performance appraisal does not only mean evaluating the performance of a staff but it provides a platform to overcome the deficiencies and set plan for the staff with mutual understanding. The most neglected part of performance appraisal process is setting SMART goals for the staff by a manager with mutual understanding. Many factors hinder the process of appraisal that include; organizational culture, predetermined budgetary constraints, capability of manger/supervisor and lack of training opportunities by human resource department. These factors may lead to dissatisfaction among staff and in the long run develops a mindset with negative image for the entire process. Maslow’s needs theory should be kept in mind to evaluate the performance of a staff as all human have common needs but with different desires to satisfy their hierarchy of needs.

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Isolated Lesser Trochanteric Fracture- A Rare But Possible Clinical Entity In Adults

Syed Muhammad Mustahsan & Syed Hasan Mustafa Rizvi

Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Abbasi Shaheed Hospital

Corresponding Author Email: mustu198@gmail.com

Abstract

Isolated Trochanteric Fracture is a rare clinical entity in adults especially when it occurs due to trauma. Isolated traumatic fracture of lesser trochanter has been reported very rarely in the literature, as usually in adults, it is associated with malignancy which should be ruled out during the diagnosis.

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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among obese diabetic subjects

Mehwish Zeeshan, Muhammad Imran, Humaira Jabeen, Sumreen Begum, Nazia Ahmed & Rashida Qasim

College of Allied Health Sciences, Ziauddin University, Karachi, Karachi-74200, Pakistan

Corresponding Author Email: imrmaan@gmail.com

Abstract

Background Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic risk factors including obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. MS in obese and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The objective of the present study is to estimate the prevalence of MS in obese T2DM subjects by using International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) definitions. Methods Obese T2DM (n=70) and normal healthy subjects (n=30) of both genders were selected from hospitals and diabetic centers of various localities of Karachi, Pakistan. The frequency of MS was estimated by utilizing criteria of the proposed definitions of IDF and NCEP-ATP III. Results The prevalence of MS using IDF definition in obeseT2DM subjects was 85.7%. It is significantly higher (p≤0.05) in females (45.70%) as compared to males (30.0%). While, using NCEP-ATP III definition the overall prevalence of MS in obese T2DM subjects was 75.7%, the prevalence is significantly higher (p≤0.05) in females (47.1%) than males (38.6%). The development of MS was highly observed between 31 – 40 years of age under criteria of both definitions. Conclusion It is concluded that, the overall prevalence of MS is increasing significantly in obese T2DM subjects by using IDF and NCEP – ATP III definitions. However, IDF is more stringent for defining MS. Therefore, it is needed to initiate the preventive measures of a healthy lifestyle and emphasis should be given to reduce weight, increase physical activity, and increase intake of healthy low-glycemic-index foods.

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volume 3 issue 4