Effects of the guided disclosure protocol on post-traumatic growth: A randomized control trial designed to observe psychophysiological alterations in traumatic stress subjects

  • Shamoon Noushad 1. Advance Educational Institute & Research Center 2. Dadabhoy Institute of Higher Education 3. Psychophysiology Research Lab, Biological Research Center, University of Karachi https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8078-4524
  • Sadaf Ahmed 1. Advance Educational Institute & Research Center 2. Psychophysiology Research Lab, Biological Research Center, University of Karachi https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9635-0202
Keywords: Guided Disclosure Protocol, Post-Traumatic Growth, Psychophysiological Alterations, Trauma Symptom Checklist, Traumatic Stress

Abstract

Background: The two constructs traumatic stress and Post-Traumatic Growth (PTG) are distinct and the psychophysiological relationship is yet to be explained. It’s a long debate that the victims who survive through the traumatic event only perceive that their suffering has helped them in improving their lives after the event or the experience actually improved functioning.

Objective: The purpose of designing this randomized control trial is to observe psychophysiological alterations associated with PTG in traumatic stress subjects.

Methodology: This Multicenter study is planned to investigate the effectiveness of the guided disclosure protocol (GDP) for the promotion of PTG, in the traumatic stress subjects and to determine whether PTG is associated with psychophysiological alterations i.e. (C-Reactive Protein, Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor, Interlukin-6, Cortisol, Heart Rate Variability and brain waves). Study subjects meeting eligibility criteria will be randomized into two groups. GDP will be used as intervention vs the control. Blinded treatment will be provided and the subjects will be made to complete study questionnaires (Screening, Traumatic Stress Scale SSS, Trauma Symptom Checklist, Post-traumatic growth Inventory) at baseline and at post-intervention (3-months later).

Discussion: This study might give us insight about the application and efficacy of GDP in a population that is seeking help and underrepresented to be clinical. Moreover, one of the more hopeful findings of this research will be significant information about trauma-related psychophysiological effects.

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References

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Published
2019-10-12
How to Cite
Noushad, S., & Ahmed, S. (2019). Effects of the guided disclosure protocol on post-traumatic growth: A randomized control trial designed to observe psychophysiological alterations in traumatic stress subjects. Annals of Psychophysiology, 6, 41-51. https://doi.org/10.29052/2412-3188.v6.i1.2019.41-51
Section
Study Protocol